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A solid work for both privacy freaks and anyone seeking tips on such matters as how to strengthen passwords make them longer and avoid simple dictionary words. There was a problem adding your email address.

Dragnet nation : a quest for privacy, security, and freedom

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Review Posted Online: Jan. Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb.

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Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Gone are the days when a single telephone hidden away in the backhall or under the stairs was considered the last word in communication facilities. As the telephone established its place in Americanhome life, it emerged into the American living-room. And it isthere that one looks first for a telephone in any home, even whenthere are half a dozen extensions in strategic locations throughout theestablishment.

Modern furniture makes it possible to have thetelephone handy but inconspicuous, and telephone stands and cabinetsmay be had to harmonise with any scheme of interior decoration. CS a-. For a good part of the year, though, we spend more time on thesun-porch than in the living-room.

To arrange a foursome, to getthe crowd together for dancing or contract, to have the car broughtaround, takes no time at all with a telephone, permanent or port-able, right at ones elbow. These portable telephones plug intoinconspicuous jacks in the wall and are moved from room to roomas easily as a table-lamp.

When one has become accustomed to thisconvenience, one feels that a house without telephone jacks is notfully equipped for modern living. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

‘Dragnet Nation’ looks at the hidden systems that are always looking at you

We see online ads from websites we've visited, long after we've moved on to other interests. Our smartphones and cars transmit our location, enabling us to know what's in the neighborhood but also enabling others to track us. And the federal government, we recently learned, has been conducting a massive data-gathering surveillance operation across the Internet and on our phone lines.

In Dragnet Nation, award-winning investigative journalist Julia Angwin reports from the front lines of America's surveillance economy, offering a revelatory and unsettling look at how the government, private companies, and even criminals use technology to indiscriminately sweep up vast amounts of our personal data. In a world where we can be watched in our own homes, where we can no longer keep secrets, and where we can be impersonated, financially manipulated, or even placed in a police lineup, Angwin argues that the greatest long-term danger is that we start to internalize the surveillance and censor our words and thoughts, until we lose the very freedom t This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website.